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Have there been any studies to modify the domestic refrigerator into part fridge and part air conditioning unit?

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 Asked by Tony Bugeja

Not sure if it has been studied. What we’re pretty certain about is that it probably won’t work. Refrigerators work by transferring heat from the inside of the fridge to the outside. As thermodynamics dictate, if you left the fridge door open this would basically end up making your room hotter unless you stayed right in front of the fridge. The idea might work if the fridge transferred the heat outside the room. The problem is that food has to be kept at around 4–5 oC, rooms at a nice 22–25oC, it would be a tough engineering challenge to maintain both temperatures.

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