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Would you dare?

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Would you dare going on a ghost hunt? Victoria Cutajar did, and talks to DARE magazine about her intense trip into the unknown. The third year communication students of the ‘Magazine and Digital Publishing’ study unit (Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences), collected people’s personal stories and crafted them into a well rounded, highly visual publication. Refreshingly, the magazine takes a big step outside the box—themed around people who dare to act differently and push their own limits.
War veteran Matthew Camilleri served in Iraq. For DARE he relives the sleepless nights under gunfire, a near death experience, and why he eventually quit the army. The magazine heavily focuses on people’s personal experiences, rather than hard facts and numbers. Another one is Martina’s story (name changed). Since her early youth she identified with the opposite gender, but had trouble being acceptance by her parents and society. Today she helps other transgender people to deal with similar issues. These are just a taste of the people featured in the magazine.
Topics in DARE range from building a successful business to traveling the world, and combating depression to religious belief. DARE wants people to take a leap of faith, and not hide behind a mask defined by society.

Dare to take a look for free.

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