Skip to content

Valletta’s Digital Layer

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Matthew Mamo
Matthew Mamo

Dérive Valletta is an initiative by digital art student Matthew Mamo (supervised by Dr Vince Briffa) aimed at increasing the visibility of our capital city’s museums and cultural institutions using augmented reality.
Augmented reality has a host of possibilities to allow people to interact with art and through this art the city itself. Inspired by the work of Israeli artist Yaacov Agam, the digital visuals featured in Dérive Valletta require the user to move around the objects being scanned in order to view the content.
Possessing its own cohesive brand and identity, this initiative is ultimately intended to contribute towards the creation of a digital cultural infrastructure within Valletta prior to 2018. Being a digital layer laid over the real world there will be no negative impact on this UNESCO World Heritage Site’s unique built environment.
The brand’s aesthetics were kept minimalistic to create an identity that can be incorporated into Valletta in an unobtrusive manner while endowing the initiative with a contemporary image. Minimalism is reflected in the restrained colour scheme and use of clean sans-serif typefaces.

The research was undertaken as part fulfilment of an MFA in Digital Arts and partially funded by the Strategic Educational Pathways Scholarship (Malta). This Scholarship is part-financed by the European Union — European Social Fund (ESF) under Operational Programme II — Cohesion Policy 2007–2013, “Empowering People for More Jobs and a Better Quality Of Life”.

More to Explore

Adrift at Sea: Laws, Morals, and Policies in Malta’s Search and Rescue Region

Since 2016, EU member states have scaled down search and rescue operations that save lives at sea and replaced them with policies intended to reduce the number of migrant arrivals to Europe. These policies of non-assistance and forced returns to Libya render the central Mediterranean one of the world’s deadliest border spaces and force asylum seekers back to a war zone where inhuman and degrading treatment is well-documented. A growing network of civil society organisations continues to challenge these policies in the courts, on the streets, and at sea. This article, the second in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM), Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM, and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM.

Concentration Camps in Libya

Following the NATO-backed overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, Libya descended into a decade of disunity and violence resulting in incalculable suffering and loss of life. Today, much of the country remains a war zone, and migrants in EU-sponsored Libyan detention facilities continue to suffer well-documented, gross human rights violations. This article, the first in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM); Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM; and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM. 

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment