Skip to content

“Give a Damn, use that Cam!”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

– Amateur Short Film Competition for University Students

Poster_for_Think2015 is the European Year of Development and it also marks the final target date to achieve the eight ambitious Millennium Development Goals established in a joint effort to meet the needs of the World’s poorest people and communities. But what are students’ thoughts about the Millennium Development Goals? What do they think of Global Social Justice and Sustainable Development?

The students at the University of Malta have now a unique opportunity to express their opinions about such issues: the Maltese NGO KOPIN has now launched “Give a Damn, Use that Cam!”, a video competition specifically for them, in the framework of the EC co-financed project Global Campus.

To take part in the competition the participants are asked to create a two-minute video inspired by the Millennium Development Goals. A total of six videos will then be selected by an international jury and put on Facebook for a second round of voting through the public. Videos can be filmed using any equipment including mobile phone, webcam or amateur video camera, and no professional recording devices are required.

The prizes are tempting – the winner gets a trip for two to Ethiopia, where he will be linked up with local development NGOs to get a better understanding about development work on the ground, while the second and third winners will receive book vouchers.

Students have plenty of time to create the video – the deadline for submissions is the 17th of October 2014.

More information on the Rules and Terms & Conditions as well as the Application Form to be submitted alongside the video can be found here.

More to Explore

Adrift at Sea: Laws, Morals, and Policies in Malta’s Search and Rescue Region

Since 2016, EU member states have scaled down search and rescue operations that save lives at sea and replaced them with policies intended to reduce the number of migrant arrivals to Europe. These policies of non-assistance and forced returns to Libya render the central Mediterranean one of the world’s deadliest border spaces and force asylum seekers back to a war zone where inhuman and degrading treatment is well-documented. A growing network of civil society organisations continues to challenge these policies in the courts, on the streets, and at sea. This article, the second in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM), Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM, and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM.

Concentration Camps in Libya

Following the NATO-backed overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, Libya descended into a decade of disunity and violence resulting in incalculable suffering and loss of life. Today, much of the country remains a war zone, and migrants in EU-sponsored Libyan detention facilities continue to suffer well-documented, gross human rights violations. This article, the first in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM); Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM; and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM. 

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment