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“Dealing with Coronus, Self-help notes for a pandemic” by Paulann Grech

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Scrolling through news feeds can feel like you’re navigating an obstacle course of pessimistic predictions, gloom-ridden reminders and alarmist articles. This bombardment of negative news has shown us how fragile our psyche can be and has highlighted the importance of our mental well-being.

Dr Paulann Grech, an expert in the field of mental health, understands the need to cultivate our mental well-being. She has written extensively about mental health and helped create “Covid-19: let’s cope” – a platform on Facebook which helped thousands practise self-care amidst trying times.

“Dealing with Coronus” is Dr Grech’s latest publication which takes a much needed upbeat approach. The humorous, anthropomorphisation of Corona as a befuddled, crash-landed alien king allows Dr Grech to present a historical account of the initial stages of the pandemic from a mental health viewpoint, in a playful way.

While the book uses the current pandemic as a framework, the mental health advice presented by Dr Grech transcends this context. These tips can help anyone who is facing anxiety, adversity or simply feels overwhelmed. Dr Grech manages to present a mental health book, written in a witty and spirited way, while still retaining the rigour and dependability of an academic text. You can order your copy of Dr.Grech’s book here. All proceeds go to the Richmond Foundation.

“This book which is shrewd, scholarly and entertaining, all at once, surfaces Paulann Grech’s passion for the field of mental health and at the same time is able to read into the complex ordeals, sometimes pain and often sufferings that Covid-19 has created on all or most of us.”Prof Andrew Azzopardi, Dean Faculty for Social Wellbeing, University of Malta

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