Skip to content

Bringing Science to the City

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Malta’s science and arts festival, Science in the City, is Taking Root once more and proudly presents its 10th festival! Our theme for this year? Taking Root – a means of empowering citizens to use research to uncover socio-political, environmental, and technical hurdles and opportunities while contributing to decisions which impact society.

Science in the City is coming to life in Malta’s capital city of Valletta between Friday 30 September and 1 October, when you can enjoy the sprawling festival within the historical walls of Fort St Elmo, Sala San Duminku, and Spazju Kreattiv. 1 October will bring with it a full day of fun and educational activities for all, taking place in Sala San Duminku and Spazju Kreattiv from 10am to midnight, coinciding with the well sought-after Notte Bianca.

Fort St Elmo The Astronomical Society of Malta

The Astronomical Society of Malta, a voluntary organisation, will be present at Fort St Elmo, telescope at the ready, for anyone who wishes to be transported into a world of cosmic venture! Discover more about the universe and fall in love with the nocturnal sky to better help preserve it. Visitors will have the opportunity to gaze into the night sky from the fortified enclosure of Fort St Elmo while being shrouded in darkness in an effort to minimise light pollution. 

Sala San Duminku  Ensonglopedia 

Join the fun at the sing-along at Sala San Duminku on 30 September from 5pm to 11pm and 1 October from 10am to 5:30pm, when John Hinton, comedy-science-singer-songwriter and the creator of Ensonglopedia of Science, will deliver a fusion of science and comedy, rhythmically combined with music. The goal is to educate people about our planet and save it from climate catastrophe. For all those ambitious vloggers, there will also be a workshop in scientific songwriting for you to create your very own unchained melody!

Fort St Elmo European Forensic Institute 

Do you seek to transport yourself to the world of Criminal Minds or Bones? Then this is perfect for you! The European Forensic Institute goes back to 2011, when experts in the fields of criminology, investigation, insurance, and security decided to unite to establish a professional hub in the field of forensic investigations. Walk in the shoes of Dr Spencer Reid and Dr Temperance ‘Bones’ Brennan and try your hand at investigating the latest in forensic tech with the experts. The event will be held at Fort St Elmo from 6pm to 11pm with the aim of bringing to light and clarifying the concepts of forensic science. 

St Dominic’s TheatreEsplora

The Interactive Science Centre, known as Esplora, was founded in 2016 with the aim of delivering an interactive experience of science through over 200 hands-on exhibits in a fun, exciting, and enjoyable way. The design of the displays enables visitors to see the importance and presence of science in everyday life. This experience also involves access to the Planetarium, an immersive experience into the other-worldly realm of the solar system. Esplora’s performance, ’What’s so special about water?’, explores the unusual things water can do in an interactive science show!

Stay tuned for more on Science in the City, Malta!

Register your interest below:

Visit the capital on Friday 30 September and Saturday 1 October. Come and celebrate the 10th anniversary of Science in the City with us at Science in the City 2022 Taking Root! We hope to see you there!

Check out our festival programme here.

More to Explore

Adrift at Sea: Laws, Morals, and Policies in Malta’s Search and Rescue Region

Since 2016, EU member states have scaled down search and rescue operations that save lives at sea and replaced them with policies intended to reduce the number of migrant arrivals to Europe. These policies of non-assistance and forced returns to Libya render the central Mediterranean one of the world’s deadliest border spaces and force asylum seekers back to a war zone where inhuman and degrading treatment is well-documented. A growing network of civil society organisations continues to challenge these policies in the courts, on the streets, and at sea. This article, the second in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM), Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM, and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM.

Concentration Camps in Libya

Following the NATO-backed overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, Libya descended into a decade of disunity and violence resulting in incalculable suffering and loss of life. Today, much of the country remains a war zone, and migrants in EU-sponsored Libyan detention facilities continue to suffer well-documented, gross human rights violations. This article, the first in a two-part series on migration, is based in part on interviews conducted with Dr Omar Grech, Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Malta (UM); Dr Derek Lutterbeck, Deputy Director at the Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies at UM; and Dr Felicity Attard, expert in International and Maritime Security Law at the Faculty of Laws at UM. 

Comments are closed for this article!